No-Stress Savings Plan

2 ways to build your wealth with little effort.

Lady sitting in chair resting feet on piggy bank February 1, 2018

By Jocelyn Wood, RCB Bank

You want to save more money.

The truth is you can save more money.

The struggle is you want things now. Waiting is hard. Saving money requires discipline.

What if saving could be easy?

Here are two ways to build your wealth that involves little effort.

1. Set the task on auto-drive.

Direct Deposit – Ask your employer to deduct a certain amount of money from your paycheck each month and transfer it into a savings or retirement account. When you receive a pay raise, transfer that to savings too. It’s called direct deposit, and the only discipline required is initiating the process.

While you may not think you have money to set aside, you do. When money is transferred before you see your income, you’ll soon forget it. You’ll adjust to living on the money you do see. And you’ll feel less stressed when you see your savings grow. Ask your company’s human resource department for details.

2. Set up auto savings.

Auto Money Transfer – Schedule an automatic money transfer from your checking account to a savings account through your online banking or mobile banking app. Set it up to recur monthly, or weekly for faster savings.

If you’re nervous, start with a small amount. Transfer the money into an account you don’t have easy access to, no debit card, no checks.

Not convinced you have the funds? Do this. Call your cell phone and TV providers, insurance companies and others and ask how you can reduce your bills. Schedule the differences you save each month to transfer to your savings account. You can set up an automatic transfer in 10 minutes or less. Ask your bank if you need help.

Saving money is a choice.

Choose to take control of your financial well-being. Then set the cruise control.

Opinions expressed above are the personal opinions of the author and meant for generic illustration purposes only. Member FDIC and Equal Housing Lender, RCB Bank NMLS #798151.
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3 ways to change your attitude about spending

Get financially fit

Ladies holding money on yoga mats January 30, 2018

By Jocelyn Wood, RCB Bank

This is the year you’re going to take charge of your money. No more rationalizing overspending. No more excuses why you can’t put money into savings. No more regrets.

Everyone can save more money.

The question you have to ask yourself is what kind of life do you want? Do you want to be debt free? Do you want those new black leather boots? Do you want to retire comfortably? Do you want the newly released smartphone? Do you want to stop living paycheck to paycheck? Do you want your daily large caffe latte from your favorite coffee shop?

Saving money is a personal choice only you can decide, and making the commitment takes effort. It requires discipline and self-control, but the end result – more money in your savings, a larger down payment on a home or being debt free – is worth your diligence.

Here are three practical tips to help you change your attitude about spending and start thinking like a saver.

#1 Match your spending

If you struggle with sticking to a budget or tracking your expenses, try this: save an amount equal to whatever you spend on nonessential indulgences. If you want your morning java, put $4 in a jar. If you plan to eat lunch out, put $8 in jar. You will literally see your spending habits and potential savings.

If you can’t afford to save the matching funds, you can’t afford whatever it is you want.

#2 Remember you work hard

Before you spend your hard-earned money, take the cost of the item you want and divide it by your hourly wage. If you want a $90 pair of boots and you make $10 an hour, are those boots worth the nine hours of work?

Also, pay yourself first. That means put money aside from every paycheck into a savings or retirement account. Saving even $25 a month adds up. Set up automatic savings through a direct deposit or money transfer. You may surprise yourself how fast your savings grows when you put it on auto-pilot. Ask your bank for more information.

#3 Do not buy on impulse

Start thinking like a saver. Never purchase expensive items on impulse. Think over each purchase for at least 24 hours. During that period, do steps one and two. This will help you consider how necessary the item is that you want to buy. It will also help you have fewer regrets about purchases and more money for savings.

You don’t have to do it alone. Find someone who will help you stay on track of your savings goal. Check out AmericaSaves.org, a site dedicated to helping individuals save money, reduce debt and build wealth. You can take the savings pledge and set up text alerts to receive encouraging money saving tips targeted to your specific goal.

Also, ask your bank about products and services that offer money-management tools. Get financially fit and take charge of your money.


Photo Credits: Pam Brown and Cherise Saltmarsh
Opinions expressed above are the personal opinions of the author and meant for generic illustration purposes only. Member FDIC and Equal Housing Lender, RCB Bank NMLS #798151.
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Are you Financially Prepared to Live Longer?

man giving woman piggyback ride January 1, 2018
By Nate Haberman, AAMS®, Financial Advisor

 

By the year 2040, it is projected that 14.6 million Americans will be 85 years old or older. This is triple in population from 6.5 million in 2014, according to the Administration of Aging¹.

Are you prepared financially to live longer? If you’re age 20 or older, retirement planning should be one of your top priorities. Not sure where to begin? I asked Nate Haberman, AAMS® Financial Advisor at RCB Wealth Management to share a few tips.

Figure out your retirement income needs.

Use your current expenses as a starting point. Don’t forget to factor in items like travel, new vehicles and healthcare expenses.

“A financial plan does not have to be complicated,” Haberman said. “Its purpose is to help you get from where you are to where you want to go, as well as improve the odds that you won’t outlive your money in retirement.”

Invest in your employer-sponsored retirement plan or an individual retirement account.2

Start now.

“It can be hard to plan for retirement when you are living paycheck to paycheck,” said Haberman. “But, a small amount is better than no amount. Setting aside a little bit each month will add up in the long run, especially if your employer matches a percentage of your contributions.”

Build an emergency fund.

Prepare for the unexpected and avoid tapping into your retirement savings.

“At one time or another, an expense will come up that you didn’t plan for – car repair or hospital visit,” said Haberman. “An emergency fund is there to help manage the financial risks of unforeseen expenses and potentially lessen some stress. Plus, early withdrawals from retirement accounts often have tax penalties assessed to them.”

Revise your plan along the way.

Life happens. Plan, prepare, review and adjust regularly in order to stay on track of your goals.

“A professional advisor can assist you through realistic expectations in your planning, while taking into consideration items like the age you plan to retire, inflation and taxes,” said Haberman. “A professional can walk you through all the available tools so you can better understand your options.”

While having a plan doesn’t guarantee a successful retirement, it may help you alleviate possible hardships, and allow you to live the life you want during your golden years.

Source:
1U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Administration for Community Living. Administration of Aging Profile of Older Americans: 2015. Retrieved from http://www.aoa.acl.gov/aging_statistics/Profile/2015/2.aspx
2Investing involves risk, including the possible loss of principal and there can be no assurance that any investment strategy will be successful. Before investing, carefully consider the risks, charges and expenses of the investment.
Opinions expressed above are the personal opinions of the author and meant for generic illustration purposes only. This information is not a complete summary or statement of all available data necessary for making an investment decision and does not constitute a recommendation. Investments mentioned may not be suitable for all investors. The material is general in nature. Past performance may not be indicative of future results.
Securities offered through Raymond James Financial Services, Inc. member FINRA/SIPC, and are Not insured by FDIC or any government agency, Not bank guaranteed, Not deposits, Subject to risk and may lose value.  Raymond James is not affiliated with the financial institution or any financial institution subsidiary.
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A penny earned is a penny saved

5 money lessons from grandparents

Group of ladies smiling January 1, 2018

By Jocelyn Wood, RCB Bank

Every year, my granddad would sit his grandkids down at the kitchen table and pour out a big jar full of coins he’d saved. We could have these coins but only after we sorted them, divided them equally and then rolled them. As little children, it felt like hours to complete this task, but the reward was a bag full of money.

When grandparents talk, we ought to listen, especially when it comes to money. They’ve lived a lifetime earning, spending and saving money. They can teach us a thing or two about the value of a dollar and the importance of saving for a rainy day. Here’s five lessons learned from grandparents.

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